How to install a Kitchen Faucet

by Team HomeServe |
How to Install Kitchen Faucet

So it turns out, I’m not as handy as I thought. After binge-watching a ton of home renovation shows, I got cocky and decided to take a crack at replacing my kitchen faucet on my own. (I mean how hard could it be?)

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In theory, it all seemed super straightforward. But in practice? Nope! (After lying on my back and fumbling around in a pitch-black cabinet for the better part of a Saturday afternoon, I realized that I have my limits!) I had to call in my dad to come and bail me out.

The lesson learned is that 99% of most people I meet are handier at home repairs than I am. But since I spent so much time researching on how to install a kitchen faucet, I thought I’d share my findings. Here you go:

Purchase a compatible faucet

Before you set your heart on a sleek new faucet style, make sure it’s compatible with your sink.

Peek underneath to see how many holes there are. If there’s just one, you’ll need a one-hole faucet. But you have more options if there are three or four holes in your sink.

As for the style, copper, brass and brushed gold are popular, but pewter and gunmetal finishes can add darker drama. For functionality, consider a motion-sensing touchless faucet.

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Under-sink prep

Clear out everything in the storage cabinet under your sink and keep a work light, bucket and towels on hand.

Since you’ll be laying on your back, set down a small ramp of plywood and an old pillow for comfort.

Shut off the water

Before taking anything apart, remember to turn off the water! If your kitchen sink has a garbage disposal or an electrical outlet underneath, turn off the power, too.

Locate the valves under your sink or, if there aren’t any, head to the main water supply line. Switch the shutoff valve to the “off” setting. If it won’t budge, try coaxing it with heat from a hairdryer or gently twisting it with pliers.

Then, switch on the faucet to relieve any pressure in the water lines.

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Remove the old faucet

To get the old faucet out of the way, loosen all of the mounting hardware and disconnect all of the supply lines from below. It helps to have someone else keeps the faucet still from above, and a bucket or towel to catch the dripping water below.

Depending on the type of faucet in your sink, you may need to use different strategies, but a basin wrench will always come in handy for loosening the nuts.

Install the new faucet

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions as closely as possible for the most successful installation.

Depending on the type of spout assembly you’re working with, you may need to hook up the main faucet, separate hot and cold supply lines and a side sprayer hose.

But, in general, you’ll slide the pieces in from above and use a basin wrench to tighten the mounting hardware. You might also need to use caulk or plumber’s putty to seal up the gaps.

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Once everything is secure, connect the water supply lines to complete the plumbing connection.

Test the faucet

Turn the water back on at the supply valves and run a gentle stream of water to make sure it works. Check for drips around the supply lines and tighten the hardware if necessary.

Once you’ve tested it out and everything appears to be dry, remove the faucet’s aerator. Run the water at full-blast to flush out any debris that may have collected. Replace the aerator and your new kitchen sink is ready to go!

After installing or replacing a kitchen faucet, you’ll want to keep all your home systems running smoothly.

Find out how a variety of plans from HomeServe can help with the costs of covered repairs.

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